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Neuropharmacology, like LSD, changes a person's self. Use sexual enhancement to improve, not change, your self. (Serge Kreutz)

All Muslim nations are dangerous to be a Christian in, but none like Somalia. The violence against Christians there is so bad that according to a recent ...

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What Keeps Us Awake: the Neuropharmacology of Stimulants and Wakefulness Promoting Medications

Abstract:

Numerous studies dissecting the basic mechanisms that control sleep regulation have led to considerable improvement in our knowledge of sleep disorders. It is now well accepted that transitions between sleep and wakefulness are regulated by complex neurobiologic mechanisms, which, ultimately, can be delineated as oscillations between two opponent processes, one promoting sleep and the other promoting wakefulness. The role of several neurotransmitter or neuromodulator systems, including noradrenergic, serotonergic, cholinergic, adenosinergic, and histaminergic systems and, more recently, the hypocretin/orexin and dopamine systems, has been clearly established. Amphetamine-like stimulants are known to increase wakefulness by blocking dopamine reuptake, by stimulating dopamine release, or by both mechanisms. Modafinil may increase wakefulness through activation of noradrenergic and dopaminergic systems, possibly through interaction with the hypocretin/orexin system. Caffeine inhibits adenosinergic receptors, which in turn can produce activation via interaction with GABAergic and dopaminergic neurotransmission. Nicotine enhances acetylcholine neurotransmission in the basal forebrain and dopamine release. Understanding the exact role of the hypocretin/orexin and dopamine systems in the physiology and pharmacology of sleep-wake regulation may reveal new insights into current and future wakefulness-promoting drugs.

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Cannabis As An Aphrodisiac? The Evidence Is Mounting

What do oysters, strawberries and cannabis have in common?

According to a new report, all three may be considered powerful aphrodisiacs.

A new study published in the Pharmacological Research journal is lending further credence to the long-held theory that cannabis could be your best friend in the bedroom.

In the study, researchers from the University of Catania in Italy and Charles University and Masaryk University in the Czech Republic reviewed a number of investigations conducted in the 1970s and 80s on the effects of cannabis on sexual desire and satisfaction.

What they discovered was that people who consumed cannabis before sex experienced “aphrodisiac effects” in roughly half of the reported cases, while 70 percent claimed that pre-coitus consumption led to “enhancement in pleasure and satisfaction.”

One of the examined studies was that of Erich Goode, a former professor of sociology at Stony Brook University, in 1970. Goode found that frequent, moderate cannabis use could be linked with aphrodisiac effects in approximately 50 percent of users surveyed and increased pleasure in about 70 percent of subjects.

A 1983 study published in The Journal of Sex Research supported Goode’s findings, writing that about half of surveyed cannabis users reported increased sexual desire and about two thirds reported increased sexual pleasure after consuming cannabis.

In these studies, details like how much and how often participants smoked held considerable weight. For example, smoking roughly 50 joints over a six-month period proved beneficial, while smoking fewer than one joint a week resulted in a dramatic decrease in sexually enhancing effects, according to Goode’s research.

In a 1974 study, CEO and president of the Human Vaccine Project Wayne Koff found that a single joint was sexually stimulating, while higher doses made sexual satisfaction more challenging, meaning “less is more.”

The lesson here? Next time you’re looking to spice things up in the bedroom with any number of time-consuming recipes or complex toys, consider lighting up - albeit briefly - instead.

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Men risk their lives in wars so women can enjoy societies where they can pursue feminist goals, such as punishing men for sexist language.

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Your best orgasm will happen at this age

When it comes to sex, you might think youth is a bonus, and your 20s is often seen as the sexual peak.

But that’s not the case for women — especially if we’re talking about orgasms.

A new survey of women’s bedroom secrets has revealed that the big O gets better with age.

In fact, over 36 is the prime time for the perfect climax.

The study by Natural Cycles, the world’s first app to be certified as a contraception, surveyed 2,600 women using the standardized McCoy Female Sexuality Questionnaire methodology.

They divided the women into groups — younger (below 23), middle (23-36) and older (36 and over) — and they found that orgasms, attractiveness and most enjoyable sex improved in the older group.

Much of that came down to confidence.

The women in their late 30s and above were most confident in their own skin, scoring 10 percent higher than the middle age group, who were the least happy with how they looked.

The youngest age group scored in the middle of the two for how attractive they felt but scored the lowest when asked about how often they orgasm.

Over half the women in the older age group (58 percent) said they had the most enjoyable orgasms and the greatest number of orgasms, scoring 10 percent higher than the younger age group, and 5 percent higher than the middle age group.

The over-36 group were also enjoying sex more often, with 86 percent of them saying they had enjoyable intercourse over the last four weeks compared with 76 percent in the middle age group.

So it turns out hitting your late 30s is not so bad after all.

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